Woodward Blog

IEEE Standards Education Grants

If you’re an engineering graduate student or a student in a capstone design course using standards in your work, you may be eligible for a $500 USD Standards Education Grant from IEEE. These grants are awarded four times per year, and include online publication of your paper; you can view final papers from previous winners here. Details from the IEEE site:

Requirements:
Student(s) beginning a design or development project will submit an abstract summary describing the project, which includes:

  • a summary of the project goal (i.e., what are you trying to build?);
  • an understanding of what standards are being considered to achieve the project goal;
  • a declaration of intention to submit an application paper for publication by the IEEE upon completion of the project;
  • a statement of endorsement from a faculty mentor must be included.

You can access IEEE standards, CSA standards, and ASTM standards via UBC Library’s subscriptions.

March 21st International Day of Forests events

Friday, March 21st is International Day of Forests 2014. The Faculty of Forestry is holding an all-day open house including a tree planting ceremony and film marathon. A schedule of events is available here.

The UBC Pulp and Paper Centre is hosting an informative lunch-time nature walk around several UBC forests to learn about tree species, bark/leaves/cones/flowers, habitats, and uses guided by PPC Researchers Nici Darychuk and Chrissy Saville.
 
Details:
Date: Friday, March 21st  *Rain or Shine
Time: 12:00-1:00 pm
Meet:  in PPC reception just before Noon (PPC address: 2385 East Mall, kitty corner to Starbucks)
Route:  visit Totem Park (near Nexterra) and Rhododendrom Woods (behind “Bean Around the World” cafe)
 
Want to learn more about forestry resources available from Woodward Library? Check out the Forestry Research Guide or contact a librarian!

 

Authors: know your rights!

Are you planning to publish your research? Do you have questions about the copyright aspects of publishing, or want to learn more about open access? Koerner Library has an upcoming workshop on Author Rights, Funding Mandates, and Open Access Publishing on March 25th, 11-12. Register here.

Happy B-Day WWW – 25 years today

ON THIS date in 1989 Tim Berners-Lee, a British physicist working at CERN, Europe’s particle physics laboratory, wrote a memo to his boss modestly entitled “Information Management: A Proposal”. Mr Berners-Lee proposed to develop a way to share information over a computer network. “A ‘web’ of notes with links (like references) between them is far more useful than a fixed hierarchical system,” he wrote. The rest is history.

http://www.economist.com/blogs/graphicdetail/2014/03/daily-chart-7?fsrc=rss

Systematic Review Search Methodology Workshop

Need to know what the search process for systematic reviews is about? This half day session, held 9-1 on March 11th at Woodward Library, will provide an introduction to the process of locating relevant studies and recording the methodology. Topics include the systematic review process, framing the search question with tools like PICO, searching Medline and other databases and grey literature sources, and tips for using citation management software for systematic reviews. Register at: http://elred.library.ubc.ca/libs/dashboard/view/4819

Workshops during reading week


Join us for one or more of the following workshops during reading week!

Introduction to Medline via OvidSP for Health Sciences
Monday, February 17th, 2014 at 11:00AM – 12:30PM
Woodward Library Computer Lab – Room B25

TO REGISTER: http://elred.library.ubc.ca/libs/dashboard/view/4696


RefWorks for the Sciences (Online)
Monday, February 17th, 2014 at 2:00PM – 3:00PM
This workshop is taught ONLINE. To access the session, please go to:
https://ca-sas.bbcollab.com/m.jnlp?sid=2011438&password=M.633726103405C16C3F95B2CA4AC37A

TO REGISTER: http://elred.library.ubc.ca/libs/dashboard/view/4693


Literature Reviews – Great Research Starts Here
Tuesday, February 18th, 2014 at 1:00PM – 3:00PM
Koerner Library, rm. 217

TO REGISTER: http://elred.library.ubc.ca/libs/dashboard/view/4768

In addition to Literature Reviews – Great Research Starts Here, there are a number of other fabulous workshops offered as part of Discover, Gather, Create, Share – Graduate Research in a Day on Tuesday, February 18 at Koerner Library. Topics include Open Access, SimplyMap, SPSS, Getting Published, Building your Academic Profile, Citation Management and Thesis Formatting.

Great Reads! Woodward Library’s Leisure Reading Collection

For a lot of people it almost seems like a novel concept: a collection of books at an academic library that you can read for fun and relaxation, and not because a prof has required it for an assignment or exam. But guess what? This is a thing that exists at Woodward Library! A couple of years ago Woodward joined the Great Reads initiative at UBC Library and began offering a collection of popular leisure reading. The point of the Great Reads collection is to give students and community members books they can read, not for strictly academic reasons, but because sometimes it’s just nice to read a book . And if it seems like Woodward is an odd choice to join a leisure reading initiative, then boy are you in for a surprise.

Not only does the Woodward Great Reads collection include several works of fiction, like Life of Pi, Salmon Fishing in the Yemen, and Neal Stephenson’s The Confusion, but the non-fiction collection is eclectic and surprising. For the layperson, there are several iterations of the Very Short Introductions series on topics like Bacteria, Fossils, and Robotics. There are books on topics ranging from the seemingly insignificant (The Earth Moved: On the Remarkable Achievements of Earthworms) to the building blocks of modern medical research (The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks); from the mildly absurd (This is Improbable: Cheese String Theory, Magnetic Chickens, and Other WTF Research) to the moderately terrifying (Slow Death by Rubber Duck: The Secret Danger of Everyday Things). And of course, I can’t understand how anyone could pass up The True History of Chocolate.

The good news is Woodward Library has books you can read for fun. The bad news is you will eventually have to finish your assigned readings.

– Melanie Cassidy, Woodward Library Student Librarian

Z $3M Prizes for Math

From today’s NYT:

Yuri Milner, the Russian entrepreneur, philanthropist and self-described “failed physicist” who made a splash two years ago when he began handing out lavish cash awards to scientists, announced Thursday that he was expanding the universe of his largess again: This time, he will begin handing out $3 million awards to mathematicians.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/14/science/3-million-prizes-to-go-to-mathematicians.html?partner=rss&emc=rss&_r=0

Mini e-books on scientific topics

Woodward Library has access to two collections of short electronic books (50-120 pages) from Morgan & Claypool Publishers.

Our newest purchase is the Colloquium Digital Library of Life Sciences which covers topics such as biotechnology, cell biology, genomic and molecular medicine, integrated systems physiology and stem cell biology.

In addition, we have continued access to the Synthesis Digital Library of Engineering and Computer Science with e-books related to biomedical engineering, computer architecture, digital circuits and systems, mobile and pervasive computing, technology and society, and more.

These books are excellent reading for undergraduates and other researchers who want a primer on a new topic.

UBC researchers named fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

Three UBC researchers have been named fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Three UBC ecologists who study the natural world at very different scales–from marine ecosystems, to plant and soil systems, to microbial communities–have been named fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). AAAS is the world’s largest general scientific society, and the publisher of the journal Science.

UBC’s Steven Hallam, John Klironomos and Daniel Pauly are among 388 members recognized by the AAAS today because of their “scientifically or socially distinguished efforts” to advance science or its applications. Six researchers at Canadian institutions are among the new fellows.

http://news.ubc.ca/2013/11/22/ubc-researchers-named-fellows-of-the-american-association-for-the-advancement-of-science/